Ploughman’s Bush

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    • #2823
      COGGINSS
      Participant

      Does anyone know anything about the landmarking, or lack thereof, of Ploughman’s Bush?

       

      I was there this morning, then did a little reading and can’t understand how this place isn’t landmarked. It was supposedly de-calendared in 2015. But I can’t find any reports or hearing notes on what happened.

       

      Thanks very much.

    • #2824
      ndembowski
      Keymaster

      Interesting.  6 Ploughman’s Bush was up for landmarking and then Community Board 8 urged “the matter be immediately deleted from the calendar of the [Landmarks Preservation Commission]” according to the minutes.

      Perhaps you can reach out to someone on CB8 who voted on the matter to find out what the story was:

      Nice looking building:

    • #2825
      Thomas Casey
      Participant

      My understanding was that there was no specific connection to any event or significant person or architect.  There were numerous renovations, and just because it is a old house, is not enough to quify for landmark

    • #2826
      bstein
      Participant

      I’m pretty sure I recall Riverdale Press coverage of 6 Ploughman’s Bush. If memory serves, whether the current home was the Delafield hunting lodge or a later building was in dispute. However, Gilbert Kerlin, founder of the Riverdale Nature Preservancy and an intimate of Edward Delafield, the last of the family to live on the Delafield estate, told me that Delafield told him it was the hunting lodge. There’s also this: https://6tocelebrate.org/site/6-ploughmans-bush-building/

    • #2827
      COGGINSS
      Participant

      Yes I think I need to speak to Chuck Moerdler or Sherida Paulson.

      Maybe Dan Padernacht remembers something about it.

      It does look like the current occupants have toyed around with it quite a bit. It’s a bit wacky.

      And DOB currently has a full Stop Work Order on it.

       

       

    • #2828
      COGGINSS
      Participant

    • #2829
      COGGINSS
      Participant

      photo taken this morning

    • #2830
      Thomas Casey
      Participant

      Yes I agree this is one of many nice old houses in the Bronx.  However, based on the facts articulated in the report linked too by bstein,  this property does not meet the standards for landmarking.  If however the area becomes a historical district, like Fieldstone, then restrictions can be put into place that limit knockdowns or total renovations.

    • #2831
      COGGINSS
      Participant

      I disagree that this sounds like just a nice old house. From LPC’s 2004 report:

      This structure is the former the Delafield Hunting Lodge of the once vast Delafield Estate, which originally encompassed land between the Hudson River and Van Cortlandt Park. It was used as a lodge during hunting excursions in the woodlands, allegedly for hunting wild boar. The Delafield Estate was subdivided in 1934, and the structure now sits within a private residential area known as Ploughman’s Bush.

      LPC Statement of Significance:

      The Fieldston (Delafield Estate) Building appears to be a rare example in New York City of a 19th-century rural bracketed, board-and-batten estate outbuilding. In 1829, Major Joseph Delafield, president of the Lyceum of Natural History in New York, acquired the 257-acre Hadley farm in (then) Yonkers that spread eastward from the shore of the Hudson River. Delafield named his estate “Fieldston” after his family’s seat in Ireland, and established a profitable lime kiln on the property in 1830. A cottage, named “Fieldston Lodge,” was built in 1849 and as a three-bay, 1-1/2 story Gothic Revival style summer home in the mode of Alexander Jackson Davis and Andrew Jackson Downing. This area, known as Riverdale after 1852, became popular for the estates of wealthy New York families, who acquired large tracts of land here beginning in the late 1820s. These included lawyer William Lewis Morris’ residence (later called Wave Hill), built in 1843-44, and actor Edwin Forrest’s Fonthill, built in 1848-52. The Hudson River Railroad, completed in this vicinity in 1849, provided convenient access to New York City.

      For some time prior to Major Delafield’s death in 1875, Fieldston Lodge was in use as the summer cottage of his eldest son, Lewis Livingston Delafield. The father’s will, written in 1867, mentions the the property then contained two cottages, one in use by the father and one in use by the son, as well as outbuildings such as a “stable and coachhouse and laundry.” Lewis Delafield expanded Fieldston Lodge in 1877-78 to five bays and two full stories plus a slate-covered mansard roof, with a wide front verandah. Local builder Samuel L. Berrian executed this addition. The building that is today No. 6 Ploughman’s Bush is similar in style and details to the expanded Fieldston Lodge (which remained until at least the 1950s.) A review of real estate maps, however, demonstrates that the Ploughman’s Bush building may appear as early as 1867.

      The eastern portion of the Joseph Delafield Estate was developed by the Delafield family as the community of Fieldston in 1909-23, and the western part of the estate was later subdivided. This outbuilding is the only surviving building remnant of the original Delafield Estate, an estate associated with one of New York City’s, and the Bronx’s leading families. It is also a significant reminder of the era when the Riverdale section of the Bronx was largely a private community of rural, and later, suburban summer estates.

    • #2832
      Thomas Casey
      Participant

      Yes……Please ask the 30 landmark voters why they do not agree with you.  Please advise the owner what you recommend they do with their property.  I just do not understand your point for this issue that has been decided already.

    • #2833
      ndembowski
      Keymaster

      I have to admit that the whole issue of 6 Ploughman’s Bush was off my radar from 2004 to 2015.  So I am glad it was brought up and appreciate the follow up posts that contain information about it.

      One of the reasons I appreciate the post is that I purchased a collection of photos a few years ago that were advertised as depicting Riverdale.  I wasn’t sure if the claim was true as there were no recognizable landmarks.  The text, written in pencil on the back, states “Riverdale?” and also lists a few names like “Moses T Pyne,” “Ms. Stockton,” and “Bertha Hurlbut.”

      Some of the photos depict a building in the background:

      The arches on the porch columns and the “board and batten” exterior bear a strong resemblance to the style of 6 Ploughman’s Bush:

      But the building in the old photos has a third story with a mansard roof, whereas 6 Ploughman’s Bush obviously does not.  According to the site shared by bstein,

      Lewis Delafield expanded Fieldston Lodge in 1877-78 to five bays and two full stories plus a slate-covered mansard roof, with a wide front verandah. Local builder Samuel L. Berrian executed this addition. The building that is today No. 6 Ploughman’s Bush is similar in style and details to the expanded Fieldston Lodge (which remained until at least the 1950s.)

      So I figure the building in the old photos is Fieldston Lodge.  Here are the rest of the photos for a taste of old Riverdale:

    • #2834
      Thomas Casey
      Participant

      These are a real time portal into the past . PROBABLY around 1880

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