September 2019 Photo Contest

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This topic contains 5 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  ndembowski 1 month ago.

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  • #1114

    ndembowski
    Keymaster

    Can you name the location of the below photo (street and cross-street)?

    Contest Rules:

    1) Your response must be posted on the forum here (you cannot email your response to us).

    2) Your response must name the street and cross-street depicted in the photo.

    3) Responses due by September 30th.

    4) You must be a member of the Kingsbridge Historical Society to participate.  Become a member here.

    Check back here for hints and a clearer image in a couple of weeks if no one guesses the correct answer.

    #1124

    Loisco
    Participant

    I’m pretty sure this location is at West 228th Street and Broadway.  Where the ladies are standing is now covered by the CTown Supermarket.

          

    I knew that there was a store on the right-hand side of the building because you can see the awning, so I looked for buildings with that particular pattern of windows, with a store on the first floor facing the street to the right. Once I figured out what I was looking for, and that I could rule out any buildings that were not in shopping areas, it didn’t take long to find it using Google Maps.

    Lois

    #1125

    Thomas Casey
    Participant

    Nice find……The Ladies and all the buildings are all in Manhattan.

    #1126

    ndembowski
    Keymaster

    Nice work, Lois.  Below is a clearer image.

    On the left you will see the “Lakes of Sligo” bar and on the right you will see a house and apartment building on Godwin Terrace.  This is the base of Marble Hill and that appears to be an outcropping of Inwood (or Kingsbridge) Marble on the left.  The photo was taken in 1949 so the Marble Hill housing projects were not yet constructed.  Assuming these ladies were in their 70s, they saw many changes in the neighborhood in their lifespan including the disappearance of Spuyten Duyvil Creek and Tibbetts Brook.  It is not surprise to me that the KHS was founded in 1949 given the changes that the this generation witnessed in the area.  That outcropping of marble would not be around much longer either.  The foundation for the grocery store on the corner of 228th and Broadway cut deep into the Marble:

    The above photos along with about a dozen others from the neighborhood will be available for members to view in the “Members Area” shortly.

     

     

    #1127

    Alan Lasky
    Participant

    http://nycma.lunaimaging.com/luna/servlet/s/x8blg3
    Here is the building on the left in a 1940s tax photo when it was a Daniel Reeves store. I love that the phone pole appears to be the same and the shadow of the pole on the building appears to be almost the same in both pictures.
    I love browsing 1940s tax photos. They can be almost as complete as a 1940s version of Google Street View, or at least hint at it.

     

    Created in Google Earth with block numbers from 1938 Bronx atlas.
    Here is a map which can assist in searching out 1940s tax photos in the Riverdale/Kingsbridge area.
    The 1940s tax photos have only been available online for about a year. They are organized via block and lot number, but unfortunately the numbering of Riverdale & Kingsbridge changed between the 1940s and now. Most areas of the city, including Marble Hill, can look up their current block & lot number at the City-Wide GIS map, and use that to search 1940s photos.

    Riverdale and Kingsbridge need the block numbers off of old maps, in this case, from the 1938 Bromley Atlas.

    The story of how the 1940s photos came to be online is a great read, and explains a lot of why things like addresses are prone to mistakes in the archive. It is a wonder any organizational info managed to stay associated with the original negatives. The block and lot number are usually included in the photo, so can often be more reliable.
    Once you have found the block number, go to the NYC Dept of Records archives, and select the appropriate collection, for instance DOF: BRONX 1940S TAX PHOTOS and try a search like block=3404, or a more complex one like block=”3404 OR 3403 OR 3267″. I’ve found searching by block catches pics you might miss if you searched by address and there was an error or omission in the spelling of the address.
    Some Riverdale blocks were huge, and were subdivided by letter, like 3423A3423W. You can delve into those divisions, and also see lot numbers, by accessing the 1938 maps (and others) at the NYPL Map Warper site. A tremendous resource. The more you learn to navigate the NYPL map collection, the more info you can find.
    The tax photo above is in Marble Hill, so be sure to select the MANHATTAN 1940s TAX PHOTOS, then search for block=2215 AND lot=591

    Some other favorite sources for old NYC photos are…
    OldNYC, which offers a convenient way to find geolocated pics from the NYPL
    NYPL Digital Collection

    New York Heritage digital collections

    Museum of the City of New York

    New York State Archives Digital Collections

    Library of Congress

     

    Once I know the location of a photo, I often seek out related photos.
    Courtesy of Kingsbridge Hist. Soc.
    This one from the KHS member area overlaps the OP. (Original Photo that started this thread.) In the back left of this photo are 226 Kimberly Place, and in front of it, 3014 Godwin Terrace. 226 Kimberly Pl is the one with the two billboards painted on it.
    226 Kimberly Pl  and 3014 Godwin Terrace are in the back right of the OP, and in the OP PS 207 can be seen behind them.

    http://digitalcollections.archives.nysed.gov/index.php/Detail/objects/27479#
    This clip from a January 6th, 1951 aerial photo shows some great detail of the area in the background of the OP.

    Simulated Google Earth View
    This is a simulated Google Earth view that is the closest I could get to the angle from the OP.

    I love that the frame house at 3014 Godwin Terrace is still there. I have been told that this is the same house that was across from The Kings Bridge and that it was moved one block east and rotated 180 degrees at some point in the ’20s or ’30s. I have yet to find verification of this, but it seems likely.

    https://cdm16694.contentdm.oclc.org/digital/collection/p16124coll2/id/28044
    This would be 3014 Godwin Terrace at its original location, 3011 Kingsbridge Ave, ca 1916.

    By 1938, the maps show the phone company building there. On a FaceBook Riverdale group, someone said she grew up at 3014 Godwin Terrace and was always told it had been moved one block and rotated to get to its current location. Perhaps there are pictures of it being moved.

    https://collections.mcny.org/Collection/120%20West%20228th%20St.-24UAKVS62PA.html
    This ca 1940 photo is looking the other way from the OP.

    https://collections.mcny.org/Collection/120%20West%20228th%20St.-24UAKVS62PA.html

    Zoomed all the way in, I believe one can barely make out the Daniel Reeves lettering. At some point soon after it became Lakes of Sligo, which I believe was a bar and possibly restaurant. It appears to have been there well into the 70s.

    I noticed that the El supports don’t match up with Nick’s most recent picture. I think the young man in the tartan vest is actually in the Bronx, and I think he is looking at the construction of the Kingsbridge Post Office.
    https://goo.gl/maps/yq7qpi5dXFcFLwLXAhttp://nycma.lunaimaging.com/luna/servlet/s/m8jrpq

    Both photos looking east on 230th St. Notice the Audubon Storage Warehouse building in the 1940 pic, I believe it is also visible behind the Tydol sign in the Kingsbridge PO pic.

    #1128

    ndembowski
    Keymaster

    Great post with lots of amazing resources for finding photos.  Most of the photos you posted I hadn’t seen before.  And you are correct about this photo:

    It was jammed in an envelope with the mystery photo so I figured it was the same spot when I noticed the marble bedrock.  However, the gas station in the background was at the corner of W. 230th and Broadway so it has to be the foundation of the post office.  Good sleuthing.  The NYPL has a photo of that gas station here and it is labeled as W. 230th and Broadway.

    Tieck’s red book has a good writeup on the construction of the post office including the human remains (possibly from the Revolution) that were discovered during its construction.

     

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