bstein

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  • in reply to: Ploughman’s Bush #2826
    bstein
    Participant

    I’m pretty sure I recall Riverdale Press coverage of 6 Ploughman’s Bush. If memory serves, whether the current home was the Delafield hunting lodge or a later building was in dispute. However, Gilbert Kerlin, founder of the Riverdale Nature Preservancy and an intimate of Edward Delafield, the last of the family to live on the Delafield estate, told me that Delafield told him it was the hunting lodge. There’s also this: https://6tocelebrate.org/site/6-ploughmans-bush-building/

    in reply to: September 27, 1909 – Dedication of the Henry Hudson Memorial #2186
    bstein
    Participant
    in reply to: September 27, 1909 – Dedication of the Henry Hudson Memorial #2174
    bstein
    Participant

    The Riverdale Press tried to drum up interest in a similar celebration of the 400th anniversary of the Half Moon’s voyage. https://blstein718.wordpress.com/?s=Henry+Hudson Not for the first or the last time, it did not succeed.

    in reply to: Soong Mei-ling (Madame Chiang Kai-Shek) in Riverdale #2127
    bstein
    Participant

    In the 1950s when I was a boy, I thought Madame Chiang lived at 3900 Greystone Avenue, the apartment building where I grew up. She certainly visited there, and gave my parents an ornate bowl from China, which my mom proudly displayed in the living room for as long as she lived.

    Incidentally, The Riverdale Press of the 1940s was a short-lived publication that had no relationship with today’s Riverdale Press, founded by my father David Stein in April 1950. Ah Ping was an early advertiser, and Tom Hsu and my father became friends. Mr. Hsu traveled to China frequently, and claimed to be working with U.S. intelligence. On one of his trips, he brought back a bolt of silk brocade fabric for my mom.

    Their friendship ended when Mr. Hsu fell afoul of the law. In 1968, he was convicted of defrauding eight victims of $250,000 by claiming to be an aide to Madame Chiang’s husband Generalissimo Chiang Kai-Shek. He was furious that The Press reported his conviction. My father never ceased to regret the story and its consequences, but he always remained convinced of the necessity of reporting the news.

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